Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien
Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien

To the exhibitions

Hungry
for
Timeby Raqs
Media
Collective

Thicket of Ideas
Thicket of Times
9.10.2021
30.1.2022

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The Paintings Gallery

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Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641), Self-Portrait, Detail, circa 1614,
© The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), Boreas abducts Oreithya, Detail, circa 1615,
© The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
Jan Asselijn (1610/14-1652), Coastal Scene with Resting Riders, circa 1651/52,
© The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna hosted by the Theatermuseum, view into the room 1: 15th and 16th century Netherlandish and German painting
© The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Photo:  Lisa Rastl
The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna hosted by the Theatermuseum, view into the room 3: 17th century Dutch painting
© The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Photo:  Lisa Rastl
The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna hosted by the Theatermuseum, view into the room 5: 17th century Flemish painting 
© The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Photo:  Lisa Rastl
Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641), Self-Portrait, Detail, circa 1614, © The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), Boreas abducts Oreithya, Detail, circa 1615, © The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
Jan Asselijn (1610/14-1652), Coastal Scene with Resting Riders, circa 1651/52, © The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna hosted by the Theatermuseum, view into the room 1: 15th and 16th century Netherlandish and German painting © The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Photo: Lisa Rastl
The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna hosted by the Theatermuseum, view into the room 3: 17th century Dutch painting © The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Photo: Lisa Rastl
The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna hosted by the Theatermuseum, view into the room 5: 17th century Flemish painting © The Paintings Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Photo: Lisa Rastl

After moving back to the Academy of Fine Arts, the temporary exhibition Hungry for Time by Raqs Media Collective will juxtapose historical works from all three of the Academy's art collections – the Paintings Gallery, the Plaster Cast Collection and the Graphic Collection –  with contemporary works by international artists until the end of January 2022.

Currently, there is no presentation of the collection of the Paintings Gallery itself on view. In the exhibition Hungry for Time, more than 100 historical works from the collections, for example by Willem van Aelst, Hieronymus Bosch (The Last Judgment, presented closed), Daniel Chodowiecki, Albrecht Dürer, Thomas Ender, Maria Sibylla Merian, and Egon Schiele, among others, meet with around 50 works by international contemporary artists such as Discursive Justice Ensemble (Kabelo Malatsie, Michelle Wong, Lantian Xie), Nilbar Güres, artist duo SPLICE (Rohini Devasher and Pallavi Paul), Lavanya Mani, Ryan Presley or Raqs Media Collective (Monica Narula, Jeebesh Bagchi and Shuddhabrata Sengupta) and many more.

At the invitation of the rector of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna the exhibition was organized by the internationally active artist and curator trio from New Delhi, Raqs Media Collective, and is a temporary view from the outside.

For a century after its foundation in 1692, the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna did not possess a proper collection of paintings - which was not unusual for contemporary European art schools. This, however, was changed by the generous donation of Count Lamberg-Sprinzenstein, who in 1822 bequeathed his famous collection of about 800 paintings to the imperial Academy.

In his last will, the founder put special emphasis on his wish that his collection be opened to the general public, and that a catalog of the paintings be published. Thus, the "Gräflich Lamberg'sche Gemähldegalerie an der Akademie der schönen bildenden Künste" (Count Lamberg's Paintings Gallery at the Academy of Fine Arts) became the first art museum in Vienna that was part of a public institution. At the same time, the collection was to be made accessible to art students, and was also to be used for teaching purposes. Gradually, it became an important element of academic artistic education - still in the 1970s, painters had to copy the paintings in the collection as part of their syllabus.

In 1877, the Academy, including all its collections, was moved to the elegant new building, designed by Theophil Hansen, on Schillerplatz, close to Viennese Ringstraße. New paintings were added to the collection in the course of the 19th and 20th centuries, and these generous donations, both public and private, significantly increased the number of paintings to approximately 1,600 today.

In view of the developments of contemporary art, in the course of which the art of the old masters lost its original relevance also at the Viennese Academy, in the late 20th century the focus shifted anew to the quality and international standing of Lamberg's first-class collection.

As it is one of three significant collections of old master paintings in Vienna today, the main task of the Academy now is the public presentation of its paintings - both in its permanent display and in exhibitions -, to research the collection in detail, and to publish the results in the museum's catalog. However, as a consequence of its historical development, and owing to the last will of its founder Lamberg, the collection is still an integral part of the Academy of Fine Arts, both by statute and in its organization, as one of its tasks is to support teaching. Thus, the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is the only traditional one that houses both old and contemporary/new art. It is therefore impossible to imagine either the profile of the contemporary Academy or the Paintings Gallery without each other, as they share a history that has been mutually enriching.

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