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History of the Institute for Conservation and Restoration at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna

1829 Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller is appointed manager of the new Collection of Paintings, the result of the donation of Count Albert Lamberg-Sprinzenstein. Josef Führich, the manager proposed by Metternich, is deemed unfit by the Council as he refuses to concentrate his energy on the restoration of paintings and the acquisition of the old techniques to the required degree.
1837 Waldmüller proposes founding a school for restorers, but the Council does not approve of the idea.
1876 The Academy moves to the building on Schillerplatz, designed by Theophil Hansen.
1902 The Ministry initiates a training course for technically and artistically qualified restorers. The Council  acquiesces but points out that due to lack of space this course cannot be held at the Academy itself.
1903 The Ministry insists on the establishment of such a school. Now the Council consents but demands the simultaneous introduction of a special course for techniques of mural art.
1908–15 Eduard Gerisch: No school is established, but curator Gerisch holds courses in his own studio.
1917–33 Serafin Maurer: Serafin Maurer, who was appointed to the Gallery, resumes teaching these courses. Graduates receive certificates, and Maurer implements an X-ray laboratory at his own expense.
1933–65 Robert Eigenberger
1933–34 Continuation of courses
1934 Associate professorship for restoration and conservation techniques. The new school shall deal with the history of the techniques used for painting and sculpture, with the materials used, especially the types of wood and canvas, slate, sheet metal and materials used for frescoes, as well as with practical aspects such as stretching the canvas, the influence of moisture on the canvas/priming and the like.
1935 Technical School of Conservation and Technology, 1937 diplomas, the right to restore all works of art in governmental possession is to be reserved for graduates.
1939–45 Technical Master School of Conservation and Technology
1946–65 Master School of Conservation and Technology
1965–86 Helmut Kortan: Master School of Conservation and Technology
1965 Introduction of the subject of paper restoration by Otto Wächter
1986–93 Gerald Kaspar: Master School of Restoration and Conservation
1993–94 Substitute: Franz Mairinger
Master School of Restoration and Conservation
1994– Wolfgang Baatz
Master School of Restoration and Conservation
1998– The Universities Act is amended by adding the right of graduates to attain a doctoral degree.
2001 Institute for Sciences and Technologies in Art
2005 Institute for Conservation and Restoration
2005– 2nd professor: Gerda Kaltenbruner
Introduction of the focus E: Moderne / Contemporary Art